Shabbat Shalom 12 Nisan 5773

Tzav by Shoshana Brombacher

This week is Shabbat Hagadol, the Great Shabbat before Passover שבת הגדול

The parsha is Tzav, צַו , translated from Hebrew as “command” and like the title, this week’s parsha explains how the priests at the Tabernacle are to perform sacrifices and covers the ordination of Aaron and his sons into the priesthood.

Tzav consititues Leviticus 6:1-8:36.

In Tzav the different types of offerings are explained; in extremely brief overview there are the:
-burnt offerings (עֹלָה, olah)
-meal offerings (מִנְחָה, minchah
-sin offerings (חַטָּאת, chatat)
-guilt offering (אָשָׁם, asham)
-peace offerings (שְׁלָמִים, shelamim)
Now from such a wide assortment of sacrimental offerings, you might assume that ordination and initiation of a priest also would involve some blood, right? You are correct! In fact, G-d instructs God Moses to kill a ram and marks it’s blood on Aaron and his sons’ right ears, right handed thumbs, and right big toes.
Moving on to the ‘thou shall’ and ‘shall nots’, Tzav contains 18 commandments, equally split between the positive and negative.
Highlights on the forbidden side include not to dine on the meat from the inner sin offering and to not eat fat and blood. On the positive side, commandments in Tzav include daily lighting of fire in the altar and daily removal of ashes.

Translations via JTS:http://www.jtsa.edu/PreBuilt/ParashahArchives/jpstext/tzav.shtml

Commentary:Aish:http://www.aish.com/tp/43918967.html
Torah.org:http://torah.org/learning/torahportion.php3
Reform Judaism.org:http://www.reformjudaism.org/learning
Rabbi Ted Falcon:http://www.rabbitedfalcon.com/weekly-focus

And calling this week’s parsha the “most hardcore holiest of holy” there is G-dcast’s animated short:
http://www.g-dcast.com/tzav

Reminder: The Search for Chametz is on Sunday the 13th of Nisan, followed by the first Seder on Monday.

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2 responses to “Shabbat Shalom 12 Nisan 5773

  1. This is Shabbat ha-Gadol, the Shabbat before Pesach, and it’s my father’s bar-mitzvah haftorah in 1924. He still remembers the whole thing, but is not physically able to stand long enough to deliver it on the day. He does enjoy going to Temple to hear it, though.

  2. Sorry, 1934.

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