Shabbat Shalom- 24 Elul 5773

There is a double parshat this week ( at least in the Diaspora) of Nitzavim and Vayelech.

Nitzavim (נִצָּבִים) is translated as “ones standing” ,covers Deuteronomy 29:9-30:20, and explains how Moses led the Israelites into a covenant with G-d, chosing the option of blessings over curses. There are no commandments in this parshat.

Translation: http://www.jtsa.edu/prebuilt/ParashahArchives/jpstext/nitzavim.shtml

 Sources of Commentary for Nitzavim:

URJ: http://www.reformjudaism.org/site-search?keyword=nitzavim&=

Aish: http://www.aish.com/tp/43918832.html

My Jewish Learning: http://www.aish.com/tp/43918832.html

Animated shorts from G-dcast: http://www.g-dcast.com/nitzavim 

The second part of this week’s parsha is Vaylech (וַיֵּלֶךְ) translated as “then he went out” and  covering  Deuteronomy 31:1-30. In Vaylech, Moses is told by G-d that his time is winding down (after 120 years) and that he should instruct the Israelites to be strong and to expect that they would be led to the Promised Land by Joshua. Of course, G-d warned Moses that the covenant would be broken and that from then on his face would be hidden. With this knowledge, Moses tells the Israelites that it is imperative that all the laws be read to all the people every seven years.Still, Moses is instructed to write (and teach) a song that can serve as a witness on G-d’s side against the Israelites. Aware that he was about to die, Moses spent his last day busy writing 13 scrolls of laws, one for each of the 12 tribes plus an extra copy to keep on the Ark. There are two positive commandments in this parsha: to hear the words of the Torah after the Shmita year (every seven) and for every Jew to write (or commission) a Torah scroll.

Translation: http://www.jtsa.edu/prebuilt/ParashahArchives/jpstext/vayelekh.shtml

Sources of commentary:

Aish:http://www.aish.com/tp/43918822.html

Torah.org:http://www.torah.org/learning/parsha/parsha.html?id1=89

Animated: http://www.g-dcast.com/vayelech

Funding for Whidbey Island Jewish Community was made possible, in part, by a grant from the Special Initiatives Fund of the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.

 

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